11 August 2009

No. 3 Line, winter [2]

No. 3 LineAnother in the series from No. 3 Line, not far from my place. I preferred a slight sepia tone for this, rather than the colder, straight black-and-white conversion. Why? I don't know. Any ideas? (Feel free to disagree if you think you'd prefer straight B&W).

All content © 2009 Pete McGregor

8 comments:

Anne-Marie said...

You do really good clouds :-) I think I've said that before. And I love that ghostly tree in the middle.

I have to admit I can't see the sepia tone. Although. May be it makes it slightly softer in tone than b+w?

Barbara said...

There are a lot of 'moods' in this shot - the bright, harsh, sinister light hitting the hill on the right, the brooding clouds and hill on the left, that line of fence atop the hill like bared teeth, and then that lovely graceful tree (a birch?) right in the center. The sepia makes the scene feel very elemental and, obviously, stirs the imagination. awesome.

Zhoen said...

The marching over the hill fence has a children's book illustration quality, while the sepia feels eerie. B&W would just be a bit too harsh, I think.

pohanginapete said...

Thanks Anne-Marie. The sepia does make it softer, but it's subtle compared to the usual sepia treatment. You'd definitely notice it if you compared it with the straight B&W, although your monitor might be miscalibrated (most are).

Barbara, thanks for the detailed thoughts. I'm pleased the photo evokes lots of moods — for this kind of photo, that's important if it's to be more than a mere record shot. It's also interesting that you and Zhoen both mention the fence; it seems to have an impact much greater than its size alone would suggest.

Zhoen, I certainly agree about B&W being too harsh, and your suggestion about the children's book makes me think about a story to go with it. Hmm... :^)

Michael said...

Sepia, B&W? I prefer the sepia as long as it's subtle (like your use of it here). We used to stain our prints with tea back in my art school days.

pohanginapete said...

Thanks Michael. Tea sounds much more agreeable than some of the toners used for sepia colouring — particularly the sulphide-based types. Rather antisocial, those ;^)

Alistair said...

The weather looks a lot more grim in the B&W shot, but I prefer your sepia treatment. Because of the warmer tones it looks a much more welcoming place.

pohanginapete said...

Thanks for the thoughts, Alistair. B&W often has an edge to it: an edge that suits some subjects but not others. The kind of toning that suits a photo will always be a matter of intuition, I think.