15 January 2017

Wallah at Josimath, Uttarakhand

Jumping back to much earlier in the journey ... In the early morning, this elderly wallah made chai for me at a small dhaba on the main street of Josimath, deep in Uttarakhand. It was cold then; now, it must feel arctic. The next day I was able to give him a print of the photograph.



All content © 2016 Pete McGregor

6 comments:

Avus said...

Characterful and plenty of surrounding interest, Pete. What are your mechanics for getting a print like this when you are on the move - do you take with you a mini-printer or do you have one of these new, flash cameras which incorporate one?

pohanginapete said...

Thanks Avus. It's a case of processing the RAW file to create a jpeg file suitable for printing, then trying to find somewhere that prints photographs. Sometimes this is very difficult, even in large towns, yet in Josimath, which is tiny by Indian standards, I found a place that advertised Kodak Instant Prints, and he produced excellent inkjet prints while I waited. Sometimes I've even returned to a place to distribute photographs I've had printed in another city. It's not always possible, but I do try.

Carrying a small printer would be impractical. I've tried to keep my gear (everything, not just the camera equipment) to a minimum, and I'd need to carry ink and paper as well and be constantly looking for places to buy more, which would probably be far harder than finding places to print the photographs. I'm also old-school when it comes to cameras, preferring cameras that produce excellent photographs rather than those that try to do everything (even video is irrelevant for me, although my camera, an Olympus OM-D E-M1, will do video).

Zhoen said...

Such intensity.

pohanginapete said...

Zhoen, he was definitely concentrating hard on what he was doing, even though he knew I was photographing (I'd asked first).

Lisa Emerson said...

I love the complex textures of this image - and I've been puzzling over what it on the wall behind the cabinet...

pohanginapete said...

Lisa, all I can remember is that the shop was small and crammed full of all sorts of things. Typical, in other words.