26 September 2012

The path we all take


A composite. The main photograph's from No. 2 Line in April 2011.

Over to you.


All content © 2012 Pete McGregor

10 comments:

Aputsiaq said...

This photo is the most wonderful one I've seen for years! I wish I could, so to speak, go into this amazing photo and take a long, long walk in this peaceful landscape. Just beautiful!!

Barbara Butler McCoy said...

I do not say this lightly: this is hauntingly gorgeous. This new branch you seem to be following is wonderful, exciting. The presence of the sheep herder is poignant, one reason being that my father-in-law raised sheep for a time on a farm in Virginia, near Charlottesville, the home of Mr. Jefferson's university.

Zhoen said...

Ghosts in the landscape.

leonie said...

I want to be there. Right now.

Relatively Retiring said...

I see this as an Old Master portrait of a landscape, in the tradition of the finest landscape artists.

pohanginapete said...

Aputsiaq, thank you! :^)

Barbara, thank you. I'd like to think these photographs — if they can be called that (compositions might be a better term?) — encourage viewers to wonder. I won't be abandoning the more literal style, just trying to push myself a little harder.

Zhoen, they're there, everywhere, in some sense.

Leonie, I'm sure you familiar with this kind of landscape. I find this kind of farmland far preferable to the easy, boring flat-land farms.

RR, thank you. Not sure I qualify for the 'Old Master' label, though ;^)

Anonymous said...

It's a magical place you've created. A fascinating work of art. I'd like to see more of these:-) Maureen

Relatively Retiring said...

Apologies, but Young Master really doesn't have the same sort of clout.

Zhoen said...

One day, you will haunt this landscape.

pohanginapete said...

Thank you, Maureen. A few more coming up.

RR, I guess you're right! It's not just the adjective, though...

Zhoen, I find that a fascinating thought, in the same way that I sometimes think of people, birds, and other things I've photographed — those who might by now have long gone but still live on in the photographs.