09 November 2010

Evening on Te Awaoteatua


In its lower reaches shortly before joining the Pohangina river, Te Awaoteatua stream flows among poplars ("cottonwoods" in the US). On a walk one evening a few days ago, I stopped at a bend in the road and looked towards the stream, the poplars, the road leading up to where I live. Day had begun to change to night; the last of winter was leaving, replaced by spring.

[5 November 2010; Canon 20D, 10–22 mm f4 at 19 mm, ISO 200, 1/4 at f8]



All content © 2010 Pete McGregor

9 comments:

Clare said...

There's a wonderful bit of found poetry in your caption Pete

Days ago, I stopped
at a bend in the road
and looked towards the stream,
the poplars,
the road leading up

To where I live.
Day had begun to change to night;
the last of winter was leaving,
replaced
by Spring.

leonie said...

i love the contrast between the grey sky and the green trees.

it feels like walking there would dampen and chill me to the bone, yet somehow i feel compelled to step into the image and go for a walk.

beadbabe49 said...

It's so wonderful to watch you experiencing spring while we're experiencing autumn....

pohanginapete said...

Clare, thanks! You've arranged that beautifully. It's fascinating to see my words arranged like this — a real honour.

Leonie, something about the scene compelled me to stop and look — it might have been that sky/trees contrast you've noticed. There seemed to be a kind of "completeness" about it. I don't know how to describe it better (and perhaps I should leave it to the photo to do that). What's curious is that I've seen this countless times, yet never quite with the same feeling that this was the moment to photograph.

Beadbabe, I have to admit I'm glad it's that way round! The thought of heading back into winter doesn't inspire me, although I accept (logically) it has its charms.

Ruahines said...

Kia ora Pete,
I like the words "in it's lower reaches shortly before reaching the Pohangina river" - it makes me think of the stream and river above there, the mountains and freedom which await.
Cheers,
Robb

Zhoen said...

I know both poplar and cottonwood. And aspen. I don't think it's a straightforward division of usage.

Such rich, deep greens.

pohanginapete said...

Kia ora Robb. I'm so looking forward to getting back into those headwaters — it's like a homecoming.

Zhoen, you're right: they're all Populus but "cottonwood" usually refers to a specific group. I admit I don't know which species the Te Awaoteatua trees are, but given the appearance of the vast amounts of seed (already beginning to accumulate), cottonwood seems fitting.

Michael said...

I know I can survive another winter knowing that it's always spring somewhere.

pohanginapete said...

Michael, I'm not sure I could survive your winters! Actually, I think migratory birds have the best idea, although flying nonstop from the Arctic to Aotearoa, like bar-tailed godwits, or through regions full of shooters, like Malta or parts of the US, has its disadvantages. Hibernation seems like another appealing option, but I'd never be able to put on enough fat to get me through. ;^)