09 April 2013

Evening at the end of the year

Daylight saving ended last Sunday morning. I can't say I'm not glad of the extra hour in the mornings, but I miss long evenings, especially when they're like this.


[30 December 2012, Panasonic Lumix GH1, 100–300 mm at 300 mm, ISO 200, 1/80 at f5.6]

All content © 2013 Pete McGregor

14 comments:

Elephant's Child said...

It is beautiful - but it is the morning light which has my heart.

pohanginapete said...

Elephant's Child — I think I know what you mean, and I do like the relative solitude of early mornings compared to evenings.

Relatively Retiring said...

Beautiful - I do like pink sheep!

robin andrea said...

Yes, pink sheep would be fine any time!

pohanginapete said...

RR and Robin: they're a rare sight :^)

butuki said...

In Japan there is no DST, so in the summer the sun comes up at 3:00 and the evenings get dark fast. So there is an advantage to using DST.

I've never lived in a land with sheep. When I was bicycling through Britain, north to south, every inch of the place, from the Shetlands down to Land's End seemed to be choked with sheep. Sheep, sheep, sheep! Some pink ones would have offered a little variety!

pohanginapete said...

Miguel, sheep used to be a dominant feature of the New Zealand agricultural landscape. Now they've been usurped by dairy cattle, and our rivers, streams, lakes, and even coasts are suffering the consequences.

Pink sheep are even rarer, and can only be seen under particular conditions ;^)

Zhoen said...

I'd call that color coral, instead of pink.

I'll take dawn or dusk, whichever I'm awake for.

pohanginapete said...

Zhoen, that's a better word. Thanks.

Zhoen said...

It's just that I hate pink. Always have.

Anonymous said...

Somehow the evening autumnal light seems more intense. That tree reminds me of childhood - I had a special fondness for birch. -Maureen

pohanginapete said...

Maureen, they're not native here and are mainly trees of urban parks and gardens; they also have a bad reputation for sending roots into drains and clogging them. Nevertheless, I like them — particularly that distinctive bark.

Avus said...

Leaving aside the sheep - pink or coral (and what about Aussie ones - all a dirty, rusty, dusty red!) this is a beautiful photograph, Pete. And yet its subject could have been easily overlooked, without your special photographer's eye. I have always maintained that it is possible to just stop somewhere and, with diligence,find something worthy of a photo - you prove me correct!

pohanginapete said...

Thank you, Avus. Maybe the trick lies in applying the difference between looking and seeing? The danger with that, though, is in spending too much time looking for photographs and not seeing what's there.