23 February 2013

Powelliphanta sp., Pohangina headwaters

On the last day of the whio survey in the Pohangina headwaters just before Christmas, we checked the uppermost reaches of the river. I picked a few rocks out of the river to see what sort of fauna was living there; Nathan had just started doing likewise when he found this beautiful native snail submerged in the stream. These Powelliphanta spp. are terrestrial animals, and if Nathan hadn't rescued it, it would surely have drowned.

We photographed it, then Nathan carefully placed it in patch of scrub where we trust it lived at least a little longer.

Apologies for the hiatus between postings. My ISP turned a simple change of plan into a fiasco that left me without a home Internet connection AND without a landline for 16 days. Normal service has resumed.


[19 December 2012, Panasonic Lumix GH1, 14–45 mm at 45 mm, ISO 400, 1/80 at f5.6] 


All content © 2013 Pete McGregor

10 comments:

Zhoen said...

Sir hand / Or is it ma'am / I fell out of my right place again / And you / Considered me / And now I'm where a snail has to be...


http://vimeo.com/7725679

Ruahines said...

Kia Ora Pete - this could be the most beautiful moment I have ever seen that includes the Ruahine. What an amazing resident of a place I love but am just a mere visitor.
Cheers,
Robb

Relatively Retiring said...

This almost makes me believe in reincarnation and wonder who you saved......but a little snail is quite good enough.

Glad you're reconnected. I laugh scornfully at those claims about how simple it is to change providers.

pohanginapete said...

Thanks Zhoen — I'd never have found that. Perfectly fitting.

Robb, this was certainly spectacular. It's rare enough to see a live snail — as you'll know, dead shells aren't uncommon — and this is only the second I can recall seeing in this neck of the woods.

pohanginapete said...

RR — we cross-posted! Good point you make, too: anyone with even a vague appreciation of the complexity of a snail would be awestruck.

You wouldn't believe the fiasco over changing plans. Actually, now I recall yours, I'm sure you can.

Barbara Butler McCoy said...

A gorgeous photo in many ways, not least of which its subject. The colors and patterns, even that little swirl of movement in that 'ruffle' - a stunning creature. Thanks. Regarding the internet lapse - not even I, who uses the internet rather sparingly, would go bonkers without it for 16 DAYS! In the lapse, did you still manage to read about the study showing salmon navigate using magnetic fields? When I read it the other day I immediately thought of you and your work. Sciencedaily.com has good article ... pretty cool stuff.
Take care.

Barbara Butler McCoy said...

Oops ... I meant to type that even I WOULD go bonkers without the internet...

pohanginapete said...

Barbara, thank you. I'd heard something about the salmon, but my recollection's vague — I might have heard it on the radio in the middle of the night. I used to keep an eye on the Sciencedaily feed, but they post so much I eventually abandoned it. I'll go and have a look now.

robin andrea said...

Nice to see a post here, Pete. Sixteen days without landline or internet is quite a stretch. Good for hiking and photography, though. Beautiful, rescued snail.

pohanginapete said...

Thank you, Robin. The absence of Internet at home did have advantages — so much so that I'm tempted to refer to it as "freedom from the Internet".